California Extends Climate Bill, Handing Gov. Jerry Brown a Victory

Democrats hold a two-thirds majority in both the Assembly and the Senate. But in pushing the bill through, Mr. Brown had to navigate moderate Democrats, who were nervous voting for a measure that could raise the cost of gasoline, as well as objections from Republicans, who have often opposed such measures as costly for consumers and businesses.

In addition, one Democratic member of the Assembly was absent this week, putting pressure on Democrats to recruit some Republican support.

While the business community was supportive of the bill, environmentalists — a critical constituency in the state — were split: Some opposed it, arguing that the bill was not tough enough on industry.

The cap-and-trade bill extends a program that otherwise would have ended in 2020. Kevin de Leon, the Democratic president of the Senate, and one of the leaders of the effort to extend the law, expressed satisfaction at the vote.

“Californians overwhelmingly support our efforts to tackle climate change,” he said. “They know it’s an urgent threat and they want us to continue to lead.”

Mr. Brown has become a global advocate for efforts to battle climate change since the election of Mr. Trump. Last month he went to China, where he met President Xi Jinping to discuss the need for cooperation to reduce global emissions. In testifying before the Legislature, he presented California’s cap-and-trade bill as a model for other states and nations.

“This isn’t about some cockamamie legacy,” Mr. Brown posted to Twitter after the testimony. “This isn’t for me, I’m going to be dead. It’s for you & it’s damn real.”

A version of this article appears in print on July 18, 2017, on Page A13 of the New York edition with the headline: California Gets Emissions Cap 10 Years Longer.

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Behold Beyoncé's babies! Singer shares first photo of Sir Carter and Rumi

CelebrityGossipMusic

July 13, 2017, 10:55 p.m.

Behold Beyoncé's babies! Singer shares first photo of Sir Carter and Rumi

All hail the Queen mother! 

Beyoncé gave the world its first look at month-old twins Rumi and Sir Carter, sharing an Instagram photo of herself and the babies Thursday night.

The photo featuring Queen Bey wearing a veil and holding the twins in front of an elaborate floral arch is thematically of a piece with the whole of her pregnancy, which often harked back to imagery of a Renaissance Madonna. 

"Sir Carter and Rumi 1 month today. 🙏🏽❤️👨🏽👩🏽👧🏽👶🏾👶🏾," Beyoncé captioned the photo, complete with emojis representing Jay-Z, Blue Ivy, Sir Carter, Rumi and herself.

The snap had already garnered over 1 million likes just 30 minutes after it was posted, just a hint of the world's eagerness to welcome the newest heirs to the future of music.

This is the first confirmation of the twins' names despite Internet sleuthing that revealed the Carter/Knowles family applying for trademarks on the monikers last month.   

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Macron welcomes Trump at a military parade — but he’s also cutting France’s defense budget

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French President Emmanuel Macron and President Trump in the courtyard after a joint news conference at the Elysee Palace in Paris on  July 13. (Stephane Mahe/Reuters) President Trump will join French President Emmanuel Macron for a Bastille Day military parade Friday — an invitation that appears to have pleased a U.S. leader who, despite having never served himself, is enthralled by all things military. For Macron, the parade is a chance to show off France's considerable military hardware to an important partner, while also commemorating the 100th anniversary of the United States' entry into World War I. Yet as the parade was due to start, there were signs of tension between the French president and his own military leaders. The problem? Macron campaigned on a platform of increasing defense spending. And this week, his government announced that it would be making significant cuts to France's defense budget this year. News of the slashed budget came as Macron's government revealed plans to lower taxes this year. In an interview with Les Echos newspaper, Prime Minister Edouard Philippe confirmed that proposed tax cuts would be offset fiscally by limiting government spending. This meant that the defense budget would see cuts of $968 million in 2017, Philippe said. The decision caused anger among French military leaders, who argued that they were already overstretched by expensive foreign commitments in places like Syria and Mali, as well as counterterrorism operations at home. French Army Chief of Staff Jean-Pierre Bosser threatened to resign over the budget cuts, according to reports in the French media  Thursday. Benjamin Haddad, a research fellow on European and transatlantic politics at the Hudson Institute, said Marcon's defense budget sent a “confusing signal after campaigning on increasing defense spending and at the very moment when France is fighting on all these different fronts.” Macron's very first trip abroad as head of state was to Mali, Haddad noted, the country at a center of a complicated West African military operation which now involves 3,500 French soldiers. The debate over spending is a major test for Macron, the youngest French president since Napoleon Bonaparte. Just last year, he formed his own political movement that promised to bring a fresh, entrepreneurial approach to government. His proposed tax cuts are a clear break from the policies of his predecessor, François Hollande, who imposed a 75 percent income tax on high earners. Macron — a former banker — hopes these cuts can make the French economy attractive to investors. However, Macron's government appears to be struggling to balance the books in a country which has long spent more than it takes in. The new French government has also promised to push down the country's budget deficit, which just last month its national audit office said would be over the European Union limit of 3 percent for the 10th consecutive year in 2017. Even within the government, there appears to be disagreement. Philippe had initially announced that tax cuts would be postponed until 2019, but he was later overruled by Marcon. Florence Parly, Macron's minister of the armed forces, is also in a weak position to negotiate, having only recently stepped into the position after her predecessor was accused of corruption. Macron's assurances during the campaign that he would increase spending to reach 2 percent of France's gross domestic product also make things tricky. That 2 percent target — a benchmark agreed upon by NATO defense ministers in 2006, but not reached by a many of the alliance's members — has been a frequent point of reference for Trump, who often suggested on the campaign trail that America's well-funded military partners were not pulling their weight. According to figures released by NATO this year, France spends 1.79 percent of its GDP on defense. Macron has said that the government is still committed to reaching the 2 percent benchmark by 2025 and that defense spending will rise next year. But analysts say that these cuts will make it difficult reach the 3 percent target in the longer term. “By making these cuts in the short term, Macron is not yet backtracking on his campaign pledge to increase spending to 2 percent of GDP by 2025,” Fenella McGerty, an analyst for Jane's Defense Budgets, wrote in an email. “However, this reduction in 2017 will make the path toward this goal all the more steep and potentially unfeasible.” More on WorldViews The subtle messages in Emmanuel Macron’s official portrait Why won’t Macron talk to the media? His ‘complex thought process’ may be to blame.

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Tim Tebow hits his first walk-off home run since high school - The Washington Post

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Tim Tebow is shown at a news conference in September. (Rob Foldy/Getty Images) Don’t look now, but not only is Tim Tebow hitting the ball, he’s coming through in the clutch. The Mets’ 29-year-old minor leaguer smashed a walk-off home run Thursday, saying later that it was the first time he’d done so since high school — which makes sense, given how little baseball he’s played since then. That blast in the seventh and final inning gave Tebow’s St. Lucie Mets a 5-4 win over the Daytona Tortugas. The former NFL quarterback went 2 for 5 at the plate, giving him a .327 batting average, with three homers and an 11-game hitting streak since being promoted to the high-A team last month. TIM TEBOW WALK-OFF HOME RUN ON THE FIRST PITCH! pic.twitter.com/O7o7sAoUt2 — Zach Dean (@ZachDeanDBNJ) July 14, 2017 At the time of his call-up, Tebow was batting just .220 for the low-A Columbia Fireflies, having not played baseball regularly since 2004, when he was a junior at a Florida high school (he quit to focus on football as a senior). Mets General Manager Sandy Alderson subsequently admitted that the organization had signed Tebow “partly because of his celebrity, partly because this is an entertainment business,” but a return to his home state seems to be doing a world of good. “I just wanted to try and come through in the end and help win it for our team,” Tebow said after Thursday’s game (via the Daytona Beach News-Journal). “I’m just thankful to get that opportunity. “It was a lot of fun to celebrate with all the guys. We’ve been working to get a lot better, and I feel like over the last couple of weeks we’ve really been improving as a team, so it feels good.” TIM TEBOW WALK-OFF HOMER IN BOTTOM 7 —>>>VIDEO @Mets #Mets #LGM #NYM pic.twitter.com/mL9XIceGhJ — Bill Whitehead (@BillWhiteheadFL) July 14, 2017 Tebow attributed his improvement at the plate to “just working with the coaches and more time playing baseball.” He added, “Just seeing more pitches, have better timing, be through the zone longer.” “The goal is just to stay behind as many balls as I can,” Tebow, whose three home runs with St. Lucie have been to the opposite field, said (via the Associated Press). “See it, let it get deep. When you stay behind it, it goes the other way.” As he was while in the Fireflies’ South Atlantic League, Tebow has been a hit among Florida State League fans, who flock to both home and away games to catch a glimpse of the former Heisman Trophy winner and two-time national champion with the Florida Gators. One can only imagine the circus that would form should he ever get promoted all the way to the major leagues, and the way he’s hitting now, that scenario could unfold as soon as September.

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